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Classic Deadlands 101: A Primer . . . draft version 3

 
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darkrose50
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 11:08 pm    Post subject: Classic Deadlands 101: A Primer . . . draft version 3 Reply with quote

I am handing this out to my group. 4/7 of us never played classic Deadlands. What do you guys think?

Classic Deadlands 101: A Primer
Note that this is my understanding of the Deadlands rules
Version 10/11/2008 2:34 PM

-----Terms-----
Marshal: storyteller
Posse: the player characters
The rest are grouped by related ideas.

-----Nature and nurture’s rankings and particulars-----
Traits: abilities that lean towards the nature spectrum (attributes). Traits have a number and type of die rolled. The number of dice rolled is most often less important than the type of die rolled.
Trait Levels: The number of dice rolled during a trait test.
Aptitudes: abilities that lean towards the nurture spectrum (skills). This is the number of dice rolled, and is paired with a trait to determine the type of dice rolled.
Concentration: A grouping of aptitudes. Some concentrations are related and all use the same aptitude level, and concentrations that are not related each have separate and unique aptitude levels.
Edge: Something sets the character apart that is special in a beneficial way.
Hindrance: Something sets the character apart that is special in a limiting way.

-----Quintessential refined substance separating important folks from the rest-----
Fate Pot: a collection of 50 white chips, 25 red chips, 10 blue chips, and one legend chip per successful adventure (or so) that are drawn randomly. Three (3) are drawn at the beginning of each session or adventure (per the marshals request). At times additional chips are rewarded by the marshal.
Chip: a token used for reducing damage, modifying rolls, and may be converted into bounty points. From least to most: white, red, and blue. A character is limited to 10 chips. If you have over 10 chips than you must convert any chip you desire into to bounty points (you do not have to convert the latest chip awarded or drawn if you do not want to).

-----Improving though surviving in nature-----
Bounty Points: Experience (a white chip is worth 1, a red chip is worth 2, a blue chip is worth 3, and a legend chip is worth 5). At times additional bounty points are rewarded by the marshal.
Improving: A character may spend bounty points in order to improve (see the improving section at or near the end).

-----Quantifying time when it matters most-----
Round: Five (5) seconds of time, the count down from Ace to Duce.
Segment: An action that takes place on an initiative card.
The Action Deck: A deck of initiative cards, the players share one, and the Marshal gets her own.
Action: a segment that a character acts on.
Long Action: performing a deed that requires multiple actions.
Cheating: On your action you may place a card “up you sleeve” by placing it under the acting characters poker chips, you may keep a single card “up you sleeve”.
Interrupting an Action: Using a card that is “up you sleeve” to attempt to act before another character during a segment. Opposed quickness rolls are made. A failure means the opposing character gets to act before the character attempting to interrupt. One success means the characters react simultaneously. One raise or more means the character attempting to interrupt succeeds fully and acts before the opposed character.

-----Rolling the Bones-----
Bust: rolling a majority (more than half) 1’s. Something unpleasant may occur, ask the Marshal.
Ace: re-roll and add the highest possible result on the die, and keep doing so as long as you keep rolling aces. The resulting total is considered to be from the same die.
Raise: every increment you beat a TN by 5 is a raise. You do not have to call them ahead of time like in L5R.

-----The inner workings of nature and nurture-----
Step 1: How many dice of what kind do I roll?
See the traits verses a TN set by the Storyteller or opposed roll section near the end of this document for a list of how traits interact with other traits and aptitudes.
A) Trait rolls: Roll the number and type of die listed by a given trait.
B) Aptitude rolls: Roll a number of dice equal to your aptitude level, and roll the type of dice of its default trait (sometimes aptitudes use other traits).

For example: Steve has a Quickness Trait of 3d8, and a Quick Draw Aptitude of 4. An aptitude roll ignores the number of dice associated with a trait. Steve could have 1d8 or 6d8 for Quickness, and in the case of aptitude rolls it is irrelevant. Steve rolls 4d8 for his Quick Draw check.

Step 2: What is the total?
A) Traits: Keep the single highest die result.
B) Aptitudes: Keep the single highest die result.
C) Strength Based Damage: Keep the single highest Strength die result.
D) Melee Weapon Strength Based Damage: Keep the single highest Strength die result, and add all the weapons damage dice to that number. Essentially this is a Trait roll combined with a Damage roll.

For example: Steve rolls his 4d8 Quick Draw, and initially gets an 8, 6, 4, and 1. Since an 8 is the “Ace” on a d8 he rolls again, and gets another 8, so he gets to roll again, and gets a 6. The results of his roll is 30, 6, 4, and 1. Since this is an Aptitude roll he keeps the result of the highest dice, his 30.

Step 3: Did I succeed?
In order to succeed one needs to meet or exceed the TN.
A) Opposed rolls: The TN is set by the result of the opposed characters roll (minimum 5). On a tie neither sides goals are advanced, and the struggle continues.
B) Non-opposed rolls: Foolproof (3), Fair (5), Onerous (7), Hard (9), and Incredible (11).

Step 4: How well did I succeed?
There are 4 categories of success: success, one raise, two raises, and three raises.

For example: Steve Quick Draw result of 30 is impressive. The TN for completing the maneuver is 5. So Steve resulted in a success, plus five (5) raises. What the five raises do in this case is up to the storyteller, but raises are often defined mechanically.

-----Combat-----

Step 1: Surprise Results
• If a surprise check is not called for by the marshal, than proceed to step 3.
• If a prepared surprise check is called for by the marshal, than a Cognition TN 5 is required to act. Proceed to step 2.
• If an unprepared surprise check is called for by the marshal, than a Cognition TN 11 is required to act. Proceed to step 2.

Step 2: Surprise Results
• If the character rolled less than the TN, than the character does not act for the first round.
• If the character rolled equal to, or greater than the TN, than Proceed to step 3.

Step 3: Initiative Rolls
Every character able rolls the characters Quickness Trait. If a character ended up rolling a majority (more than half) 1’s, it’s a bust, and the character does not get to draw any cards. If a character rolled above a 1, than one card is drawn, and one additional card is drawn per multiple of 5 rolled (to a maximum of 5 cards). Proceed to step 4.

1 = no card (a bust equates not acting this round)
2-4 = 1 card
5-9 = 2 cards
10-14 = 3 cards
15-19 = 4 cards
20+ = 5 cards

Step 4: Initiative Order
End of segment note: return to this step for the next segment

Card Order: Ace, King, Queen, Jack, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2
Suit Order: Spades, Hearts, Diamonds, Clubs
Red Joker: The character may take an action at any time during the round. The character automatically succeed with a raise when interrupting an action. If drawn from the player’s action deck, then the character draws a chip from the fate pot.
Black Joker: Discard any cheating cards “up your sleeve”, discard the black joker, reshuffle after the round, and if this is from the players action deck, than the marshal gets to draw a chip from the fate pot.

Step 5: Determine the action to be taken during the characters segment.
• Test to remove the stunned condition (Proceed to step 6).
• Test of wills action (proceed to step 7).
• Close combat action (proceed to step Cool.
• Ranged combat action (proceed to step 9).
• Other action (proceed to step 10).

Step 6: Recovery Check
The character must roll Vigor verses the TN of the highest wound level or remain stunned.
• If the Vigor result was unsuccessful, than the stunned effect remains. End of action.
• If the Vigor result was successful, than the stunned effect is removed. End of action.

Step 7: Test of Wills
A) Opposed aggressors Bluff verses defenders Scrutinize.
B) Opposed aggressors Overawe verses defenders Guts.
C) Opposed aggressors Ridicule verses defenders Ridicule.

The Defenders roll becomes the TN (ties have no effect).

• If the aggressors total is equal to or less than TN, than there is no effect. [end of action]
• If a TN+1 to TN+4 is met, than the target is Unnerved (defender is -4 to next action) [end of action]
• If a TN+5 to TN+9 is met, than the target is Distracted (defender looses highest action card) [end of action]
• If a TN+10 is met, than the target is Broken (defender is -4 to next action, defender looses highest action card, and the aggressor draws a chip from the Fate Pot!) [end of action]

Step 8: Close Combat. Do you have a close combat weapon drawn, or ready?
• If you are using a natural weapon, proceed to step 12.
• If you have a close combat weapon ready, then proceed to step 12.
• If you do not have a close combat weapon ready, proceed to step 11.

Step 9: Ranged Combat
• If you are using a natural weapon, proceed to step 13.
• If you have a ranged combat weapon ready, then proceed to step 13.
• If you do not have a ranged combat weapon ready, proceed to step 11.

Step 10: Other action
If some other type of action is attempted, than its resolution may be outside the boundaries of this procedure (consult the rules or the marshal).
• If the other action result was unsuccessful, than end of action.
• If the other action result was successful, than end of action.

Step 11: Quick Draw
Quick Drawing a weapon requires a TN 5 Quick Draw roll.
• If the Quick Draw result was unsuccessful, than end of action.
• If the Quick Draw <Close Combat> result was successful, then proceed to step 12.
• If the Quick Draw <Ranged Combat> result was successful, then proceed to step 13.

Step 12: Close Combat Attack
The base TN for close combat is Fair (5) plus the relevant close-combat aptitude level of the defender.

[Insert combat modifiers]

• If the Close Combat Attack result was unsuccessful, than end of action.
• If the Close Combat Attack was successful, proceed to step 14.

Step 13: Ranged Combat Attack
The base TN for ranged combat is 5.

Firer is walking [-2 Penalty]
Firer is running [-6 Penalty]
Firer is mounted [-2 Penalty]
Firer is wounded [Modifier Varies]
Size [Modifier Varies]
Target moving Pace 20+ [Penalty -4]
Target totally concealed [Penalty -4]
Torchlight, twilight [Penalty -4]
Moonlight [Penalty -6]
Blind, total darkness [Penalty -8]

• If the Ranged Combat Attack result was unsuccessful, than end of action.
• If the Ranged Combat Attack was successful, proceed to step 14.

Step 14: Vamoosing
• If the defender does not have an action card, than proceed to step 16.
• If the defender has an action card, than the character may discard the highest action card held to attempt to dodge. Proceed to step 15.

Step 15: Dodge
Dodging an attack requires a Dodge roll, and the result replaces the defenders TN needed to get hit.
• If the attacker rolled less than the Dodge result, than end of action.
• If the attacker rolled equal to, or grater than the Dodge result, than proceed to step 16.

Step 16: Hit Locations (modified for simplicity)
20 Head OOOOO +2d damage*
15-19 Guts OOOOO
13-14 Right Arm OOOOO
11-12 Left Arm OOOOO
10 Gizzards (Guts) +1d damage*
5-9 Lower Guts (Guts)
3-4 Right Leg OOOOO
1-2 Left Leg OOOOO
*Only lethal attacks get this bonus

Step 17: Damage
Note: Chips may only be used to increase strength based damage (and only the strength portion of the roll).
• If the damage is non-lethal, than proceed to step 18
• If the damage is lethal, than proceed to step 19

Light [-1 Penalty / TN 3]
Heavy [-2 Penalty / TN 5]
Serious [-3 Penalty / TN 7]
Critical [-4 Penalty / TN 9]
Maimed [-5 Penalty / TN 13]

Step 18: Non-lethal Damage
Modified opposed roll (no minimums) Damage verses Vigor. One (1) point of wind damage is caused to the target per Damage result over the Vigor result. End of action.

[Add “if, then” statements defining wind]

Step 19: Lethal Damage
Every multiple of the victim’s size is a wound category. Each location is tracked separately. The highest penalty modifies dice rolls. The TN is used in stun, recovery, and doctor rolls. Proceed to step 20.

[Add “if, then” statements defining damage catigories]

Step 20: Stun Check
For each hit that causes one or more wounds a character must roll Vigor verses the TN of the wound level. The wound penalties to resist being stunned are not applied to a stun check. However, when figuring the TN to resist being stunned the most recent wound is counted.

Example: Curtis has a Light (-1) wound penalty from a previous injury to the guts. He takes a new level two wound to the gut, adding up to a Serious wound, however he rolls his Vigor with his “level 1” light (-1) penalty, but is rolling against a “level 3” Serious (7) TN. The new two wound levels will not affect his penalty to his stun check roll.

If the character does not meet the TN, than the character is stunned, and looses the highest action card in his hand as well as any cheating card up his sleeve. In addition the character must attempt a recovery check each segment the character holds an action card for. Proceed to step 21.

Step 21: Wind Damage
Every wound causes 1d6 wind damage (minimum 1d6). End of action.

Example 1: If a size 6 human was hit for less than 6 points, than 0 wounds, and 1d6 wind would be the damage.
Example 2: If a size 6 human was hit for 10 points, than 1 wounds, and 1d6 wind would be the damage.

[Add “if, then” statements defining wind]

----------

Poker Probabilities from a 5-card to a 10-card hand

Huckster Odds From Deadlands Wiki
http://omegawolfstudios.com/deadlands/wiki/index.php?title=Huckster_Odds

Traits verses a TN set by the Storyteller or opposed roll
Academia (Philosophy, History, Occult, Others) TN rarely related
Animal Wrangling Mien
Area Knowledge TN
Artillery (Cannons, Gatling Guns, Rockets) TN Sighting and Placing uses Cognition
Arts (Painting, Sculpting, Sketching) TN
Bluff Scrutinize
Bow TN
Climbing TN Pace: 2+level [max5]
Demolition TN
Disguise Scrutinize* *Success raises suspicion, raise sees though the disguise.
Dodge TN
Driving (Steam Boat, Ornithropter, Steam Wagon, Others) TN
Faith TN
Fighting (Brawling, Knife, Lariat, Sword, Whip, Wrestling) TN
Flitching Cognition
Gambling TN
Guts TN
Hexslinging Special
Horse Riding TN Page 74
Languages (Others) - 1-point speak, 2-points read & write
Leadership TN
Lockpicking TN 43
Mad Science Special
Medicine TN Light 3*, Heavy 5*, Serious 7**, Critical 9**, Maimed 13**, * = General Needed, and ** = Surgery needed. Veterinary is required for animals for both * and **’s.
Overawe Guts
Performing TN
Persuasion Scrutinize
Professional TN Aptitudes are never related
Quick Draw TN 5
Ridicule Ridicule
Ritual Special
Science TN Alchemy, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, or Physics are never considered related.
Scrutinize Bluff
Search TN
Scrounging TN
Shooting Special See combat notes
Slight of Hand Cognition? Can be used as quick draw for small weapons
Sneak Search
Speed Load TN Load thee bullets 3, load a sped-load cylinder 5, two rounds 9, three rounds 11
Streetwise TN
Survival TN
Swimming TN
Tale Telling ???
Teamster TN
Throwing Special See combat notes
Tinkering TN
Tracking TN See chart on page 48
Trade TN Aptitudes are never related

-----Improving-----
Costs are paid in bounty points.
One may only advance each of the following one (1) level per session.
o Traits cost three (3) times the next die type in the hierarchy (there are special rules for advancing beyond the d12 level) and/or two (2) times next trait level (there are no restrictions in improving trait levels).
o Aptitudes cost an amount of bounty points equal to the next die type in the hierarchy (there are special rules for advancing beyond the 5d level).
o Some aptitudes require the marshals permission to acquire (one does not pick up chemistry or the like without study or good cause).

Ones improvements of the following are limited only by bounty points.
o Related concentrations cost three (3) bounty points each.
o Some edges may be purchased at a cost of three (3) bounty points per character generation point. I would think edges such as Sand, and Tough As Nails would be in this category (check with the martial).

Ones improvements of the following are limited by bounty points, and the Marshals approval.
o Some hindrances may be bought off at a cost of two (2) bounty points per character generation point.
o Some edges may be purchased at a cost of three (3) bounty points per character generation point.


Last edited by darkrose50 on Sat Oct 11, 2008 2:36 pm; edited 2 times in total
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one-arm winters
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Joined: 18 Feb 2006
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Location: Las Vegas, NV

PostPosted: Sat Oct 11, 2008 12:27 pm    Post subject: Re: Classic Deadlands 101: A Primer . . . draft version 2 Reply with quote

darkrose50 wrote:

Edge: Something sets the character apart that is special in a limiting way.
Hindrance: Something sets the character apart that is special in a beneficial way.


These are reversed. Edges are beneficial, Hindrances are limiting.

Quote:
-----Rolling the Bones-----
Bust: rolling all 1’s. Something unpleasant may occur, ask the Marshal.

Going bust results when the majority (more than half) of the dice are 1's


Quote:
C) Strength Based Damage: Add all the weapons damage dice together.
Strength based damage is a trait roll like any other. You keep the single highest strength die, and add all of the weapon damage dice to this value. Or did you mean Weapon-based damage and not strength-based?

Quote:
-----Combat-----


Step 3: Initiative Rolls
Every character able rolls the characters Quickness Trait. If a character ended up rolling all 1’s, it’s a bust, and the character does not get to draw any cards. If a character rolled above a 1, than one card is drawn, and one additional card is drawn per multiple of 5 rolled (to a maximum of 5 cards). Proceed to step 4.
Correct Bust with majority dice

Quote:

Step 17: Damage
Note: Chips may not be used to modify damage
• If the damage is non-lethal, than proceed to step 18
• If the damage is lethal, than proceed to step 19
Unless it is strength-based damage, in which case, fate chips can be used to increase the strength portion, like a normal trait roll.


Now, I skimmed the aptitude's list.

My first opinion is that there is a lot of extraneous descriptions that seem more likely to confuse potential players than help them het the feel for the game.. for example

-----Nature and nurture’s rankings and particulars-----
Traits: abilities that lean towards the nature spectrum (attributes). Traits have a number and type of die rolled. The number of dice rolled is most often less important than the type of die rolled.

I think, as a new player, it might simply be that your Trait is how well you are at the basics. If your quickness is 4d8, yer fairly quick. If your smarts is only 1d8, yer not the brightest light in the lamp.

I also noticed a lot of stuff in the combat section..
Quote:
Step 9: Ranged Combat
• If you are using a natural weapon, proceed to step 13.
• If you have a ranged combat weapon ready, then proceed to step 13.
• If you do not have a ranged combat weapon ready, proceed to step 11.

Why not list the basics of ranged combat in step 9: Ranged Combat. Or, have a step right above this. something like
"Type of attacks".. If you are using a natural, or melee weapon, proceed to close combat, if you are using a ranged weapon (gun, bow, flame thrower, thrown dynamite, etc.) then proceed to ranged combat. That way people don't think "Hmm, I'm firing a gun, I need to go to Ranged Combat.. no wait, this tells me I need to go somewhere else"..


Anyway, just a few ideas from me. If I were a new player, I would appreciate a little less-confusing language, and sections describing their stuff in that section, instead of sending me elsewhere. Cheat-sheets should be as simple, and easy to navigate as possible.
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darkrose50
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 11, 2008 2:41 pm    Post subject: Re: Classic Deadlands 101: A Primer . . . draft version 2 Reply with quote

one-arm winters wrote:

I also noticed a lot of stuff in the combat section..
Quote:
Step 9: Ranged Combat
• If you are using a natural weapon, proceed to step 13.
• If you have a ranged combat weapon ready, then proceed to step 13.
• If you do not have a ranged combat weapon ready, proceed to step 11.

Why not list the basics of ranged combat in step 9: Ranged Combat. Or, have a step right above this. something like
"Type of attacks".. If you are using a natural, or melee weapon, proceed to close combat, if you are using a ranged weapon (gun, bow, flame thrower, thrown dynamite, etc.) then proceed to ranged combat. That way people don't think "Hmm, I'm firing a gun, I need to go to Ranged Combat.. no wait, this tells me I need to go somewhere else"..


Essentially I wanted each variable to be its own step. I needed to work Quick Draw in there. I could also make a flow chart, now is a good time to learn I guess.

one-arm winters wrote:
Anyway, just a few ideas from me. If I were a new player, I would appreciate a little less-confusing language, and sections describing their stuff in that section, instead of sending me elsewhere. Cheat-sheets should be as simple, and easy to navigate as possible.


Thanks for the help! I fixed everything but the wording on Traits and Aptitudes . . . I’ll work on that next.

Oh the "Traits verses a TN set by the Storyteller or opposed roll" is on a chart that does not look right here.
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one-arm winters
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 11, 2008 4:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is something I wrote up a while ago when I was starting to to run the game for a couple friends who had never played it. Since then, when we get new players, I mainly tell them the basics at the game, or write them a brief email. I have learned to shorten it as we go on.. but here you go..

PS, there may be some discrepencies between this and actual rules. Like in my game, we play that a Legend chip negates all incoming wounds from a single attack... so In those cases, thats our particular house rule.



Quote:
Now, you have mental and corporeal traits. These are your attributes basically. Then you have aptitudes... these are your skills.
You will notice each trait has a section for what type of dice this trait is to the left of the trait. To the right is a section for how many dice that trait has, or coordination.

So, if you have a 3d12 for smarts, and you need to roll a smarts coordination, you roll 3d12. If, you have a survival aptitude of a 2, then you roll 2 dice, which are d12's because it is a smarts aptitude.. skills are always the same die type as the trait it belongs with.

There are a few exceptions that fall outside of typical use. Say you want to appraise a gun. Well, appraising something typically falls under cognition, and you would roll the amount of dice equal to your shootin' aptitude. Example. Cognition of 2d10, shootin of 3d12.. you would roll 3 dice (shootin aptitude) but it would be 3d10, since d10 is your cognition die type


Dice Rolling.
When you are rolling tasks (skills, combat, etc) you roll your dice, and take the highest die, and try to beat the TN (Target Number). For most tasks, the TN is 5. When you roll the highest number on a die, this is called an Ace. You may roll that die again and add it to to the total. You roll until the die shows something other than the highest number. Example. 4d12. You roll a 1, 8, and two 12's. You roll both 12's again. 5 and 12 again. So you reroll the single 12 once more and you get a 6. Your total for this roll is 30 (12+12+6)

Why bother keeping track of how high you roll? Because there is such a thing as "raisin' the pot" For every 5 points by which you beat the TN, you score a Raise. Now, a Raise has different effects, depending on what you are doing. When casting a hex, or gambling, each raise gives you an extra card in which to use. When shooting, each raise allows you to adjust your hit location up or down by that many positions.


Unskilled Checks.
When you make an unskilled aptitude test, you first see if you have any related aptitudes. Shootin Rifles instead of Pistols, or Throwin Balanced instead of unbalanced. If you have a related aptitude, you may roll that, but you suffer a -4 to the result. If you do not have a related aptitude, then you may roll a single die of the trait type, and tack on a -4 to the result. Example. If you have Deftness of 4d10, and Shootin: Rifle at 3d10, but want to use a shotgun for whatever reason, you would roll 3d10-4. If, however, you had no shootin skills whatsoever, you would roll a single d10-4 (a single die of the trait's type with the -4). Other related aptitudes are sometimes, but not always, search and trackin', or persuasion and bluff.

Going Bust. When the majority of your dice show 1's, regardless of whether you succeed or not, you go bust. Something bad happens. You may still hit your target, but your gun may slip out of your hand. It all depends on what you are doing. You cannot spend fate chips (discussed later) when you go bust on a roll, with the exception of a legend chip which can be used to reroll entirely.

Damage.
When you roll damage, you add up your damage dice. Aces apply to damage, so if your damage is 3d6 and you roll 4, 6, and 6. You roll those 6's again until you get something other than 6's and you take the grand total. This is how much damage you do.

Wounds.
Most people in Deadlands have a size of 6. This basically means that all damage is divided by 6 to figure out how many wounds you take. Each location can take 5 wounds before it is maimed, destroyed, what not. When someone takes 5 wounds to an arm, that arm is now useless. 5 wounds to the head or guts will kill a character, but not necessarily permanently.

Each wound level has a -1 modifier to die rolls. So if you have 2 wounds, your die rolls suffer a -2 modifier.

Each Location tracks wounds separately, and penalties are only assessed by the highest wound in any given area. So if you have 2 wounds to the right arm, and 1 to the left, you only suffer a -2 penalty (not -3, because -2 is the highest in any location).

When you take a wound, you also suffer 1d6 WIND per wound. Wind is like shock, fatigue, etc. It is determined by adding the die types of your Spirit and Vigor. So a character with 3d6 Spirit and 2d10 Vigor has a wound total of 16. When Wind reaches 0, your character is fatigued and pretty much out of action for a time.

Now, For each wound you take, you suffer 1d6 wind. So if you are taking 4 wounds, you also take 4d6 Wind. Even attacks that do damage, but not enough to inflict a wound, cause 1d6 wind.

Another effect of taking attacks. When you suffer a wound, you must make a stun check by rolling Vigor against the wound penalty. Wind requires a TN3, Light Wound requires TN 5, etc etc. If you make the roll, you are not stunned, otherwise you are stunned until you can make a recovery roll.


Actions and Initiative
First, there is surprise. When there is a chance of surprise, those involved need to make a TN5 Cognition check (sometimes modified depending on situation) to see if they are aware of the impending threat. If they make the roll, they may make their Quickness rolls. Otherwise, they stand there surprised, receive no cards for that round, and must succeed at a TN5 Guts check next round to shake off the surprise and roll Quickness.

Quickness Rolls. When combats start, everyone not surprised rolls their Quickness Trait. TN is 5 like normal. Take into account all wound penalties. Everyone receives 1 card, Plus 1 card for every success and raise on their quickness rolls. So someone who manages to roll 17 on his quickness roll receives 4 cards (1 Plus 1 for success and 2 raises). A player can only have a max of 5 cards, and if you go bust on your quickness rolls, you receive no cards for that round.

Once everyone has their cards, the Marshal counts down from Aces, then kings, etc. When a count comes up in which you have a card, you may act. If there is a tie, suits determine who acts first, in this order. Spades, hearts, diamonds, clubs. If there is still a tie (since the players and the marshal uses different decks) these actions happen simultaneously.

Speeds.
Actions have speeds, typically a 1, but some spells and hexes are higher. Basically, speed is how many actions (cards) it takes to complete said action. If a hex has a speed of 2, it requires 2 consecutive cards to be spent on completing that action. Some actions can have cards spent in a non-consecutive fashion. Example, if climbing a ladder is speed 3, you can stop after 2 cards, hang there and shoot a couple rounds before you spend that last card getting to the top.



Reshuffling
When the action deck reaches it's end, reshuffle immediately. All cards set aside to prepare actions are also reshuffled. Just remember that they have been spent. You also reshuffle the deck at the end of any round in which a Black Joker was dealt. "Sleeved" cards remain sleeved and are not reshuffled into the deck.

Cheatin.
When your card comes up, if you have nothing better to do (Say you know a werewolf is out there somewhere and you want to wait), you can put that card up your sleeve (not necessarily literally). Set that card aside, and you can use it whenever you want. There is even a chance you can interrupt someone else. If you want to try, you both make quickness rolls, the winner goes first.

Jokers.
Jokers can never be hidden up your sleeve. Red Jokers are wild, and can be used at any time in the round. You may even interrupt someone without needed to beat them in a quickness roll.
Black Jokers, on the other hand, are not good. When a black Joker is drawn, that character loses the Joker and a sleeved card if he has one. That side's action deck must also be reshuffled at the end of the round.

Pace
Everyone has a pace equal to their Nimbleness Trait. someone with a 3d4 Nimbleness can move 4 yards per round, where someone with a 1d12 can move 12 yards per round. you may move up to twice your pace in a single round, divided among your actions as you see fit, but if you ever move more than your pace on a single card, you are considered "running" and suffer a -4 to actions taken.

Shootin' Things
When you want to shoot something, you make a shootin roll. Your TN is 5, Plus any modifiers for range. To figure modifiers, count up how many yards to the target, divide by the range increment of the weapon and round down. The number you get is added to the TN. Example, a Peacemaker has a Range increment of 5. Shooting a target 1-5 yards away is a TN5. 6-10 yards away is TN6, etc.

Shotguns. Because of the spread, shotguns usually hit better than most weapons. When someone fires a shotgun with buckshot, they add +2 to their attack roll. The damage inflicted is a base 2d6, plus up to 4d6 bonus damage. It loses 1d6 at non-point blank and per 10 yards past the first down to it's base 2d6 damage. so at point blank, the damage is 6d6, 1-10 yards, they roll 5d6 in addition to their attack dice, 11-20 4d6 etc. (still looking for the highest single die to determine success). Another option with shotguns is firing slugs. When you fire slugs, you suffer a -2 to hit, but you always do 6d6 damage if you hit.




So, by now, you are probably wondering. . . "If they just need a TN5 to hit me, I am gonna be toast real quick." Well, most likely, you are. But, there are options. First, if the defender is moving faster than pace 20, the attacker suffers a -4. If the attacker is walking or running, he suffers another -2 or -4 respectively. Sure, this is all well and good if they are both running in circles or whatnot, but what if the defender can't move?

Vamoose!! When you Vamoose, you give up your highest card (or sleeved card if you have one) and you make a Dodge roll. Your total becomes the new TN (EVEN IF YOU ROLL WORSE!!!). So, if you have a real bad dodge skill, you are probably not going to be vamoosing too much. But it's an option.

So what do you do to keep yourself alive? Fate Chips.

Fate Chips
Fate chips come in three varieties. White, Red and Blue.
A White fate chip lets you roll an additional die with an aptitude test, for a chance at getting a higher number. Any number of white chips can be spent on a single action.
A Red and Blue chip let you roll an additional die and add it to your current highest total, as if you had rolled an ace.... But, when you use a red chip, the Marshal (me) gets an extra chip to use. Only 1 red or blue chip can be used on a single action, and once you spend a red or blue, you cannot spend anymore whites.

Fate chips can also be used to negate incoming wounds and recover wind.
White chips negate 1 wound, or can be used to recover 5 wind
Red chips negate up to 2 wounds, or recover 10 wind
Blue chips negate up to 3 wounds, or recover 15 wind.
Legend chips negate all incoming wounds from a single attack, or recover all wind

Fate chips can also be converted into Bounty Points (experience) at the end of a session. Blue chips are worth 3 bounty points, red 2, and whites are worth 1. Legend chips are worth 5 bounty points.


Bounty Points.
You can use bounty points to raise traits, aptitudes, or learn hexes. New aptitudes cost the amount you are raising them to. So to raise shootin from a 3 to a 4 costs 4 bounty points.

To raise your coordination in a trait costs 2 times the new level. So to raise strength from 4d6 to 5d6 costs 10 points.

Raising a trait costs 3 times the new die type. So to take that strength from 4d6 to 4d8 would cost 24 bounty points.


Hexes I shall cover briefly.

Basically, you have your Hexslinging skill. This is how many dice you roll, and the type typically depend on the hex in question. Some require spirit type, some smarts. You roll your dice, and try for a TN5, like normal. Success means you deal yourself 5 cards from the hex deck (a separate deck from the action deck) Each raise (every 5 points past your TN) you deal an extra card. You then try to build the best had available with 5 of the cards you have.. Some hexes have a minimum hand, some hexes have different effects depending on what hand you have. Like Soulblast, the Hucksters main attack spell, deals 1d6 wind with a pair, 3d6 damage with 2 pair, up to 8d10 for a full house, or 10d20 for a royal flush, while a dead mans hand (black aces and eights, and jack of diamonds) kills the target instantly

Most hexes have a speed one 1, but some have speeds higher as well, and they are resolved just like normal actions. Wound penalties also apply to the hex roll, and other penalties, such as moving and such apply as well.
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